You are here

Food Waste

Take the pledge and commit to making choices that will keep your food from becoming waste. You can take the pledge as an individual, school, business/organization, household, or community.

When you take the Food Waste Pledge, you'll committ to:

This food waste is worth an estimated $27 billion each year. This indicates that significant opportunities exist for businesses along food value chains to streamline their operations, reduce food waste, and increase profit, while making better use of scarce resources, managing risk, and reducing their environmental footprint. Despite recent initiatives by companies and industry associations, the Canadian agri-food industry lacks a coordinated approach to addressing food waste.

At the Root Cellar, Victoria’s busy green grocer, the fresh produce is in perpetual motion—turned, trimmed, culled and completely refreshed by an army of workers twice each day. Co-owner Daisy Orser says her nearly 100 employees, whether they’re stocking clerks or cashiers, are all trained to cull produce that’s not perfect. But you won’t find much of it in the waste bin, because the company has several systems in place to make sure that less than one per cent of the food they buy hits the compost.

A collaborative approach involving governments, businesses and NGOs is essential because governments in Canada have limited leverage to change the design of products or packaging in a global market. To be successful, we need to adopt a national approach, involving governments, businesses and NGOs, to align with global best practices in design change and policy innovation that will prevent waste and facilitate a transition to circular economies. And while design change is essential, so is behaviour change – among consumers and across supply chains.

You're eating local, maybe organic, or even growing your own food. Make sure you don't end up throwing out the fruits and vegetables of your hard-earned labour. Besides being a waste of money, time and energy, unused food that ends up in landfills is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases.

The stats are staggering:

Be honest: How often do you throw away food? Maybe that can of peas has gone past the expiry date, or maybe that bunch of carrots doesn’t look as fresh as it should. Most likely, you toss it in the garbage.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, about 1.3 billion tonnes of food gets wasted each year, with fruits and vegetables accounting for the highest amount of food wasted.

In Canada, we’re no different.

Ontario wants to ban food waste from being thrown in curbside trash bags by 2022.

Food and organic waste made up about a third of Ontario's total waste in 2014, according to a discussion paper prepared by the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change.

That same paper states that nearly 2.4 million tonnes of food and organic waste was sent to disposal at landfills in 2014.

To combat this the province announced a strategy for "a waste-free Ontario" that includes 15 action points to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from landfills.

In Canada, $31 billion worth of food ends up in landfills or composters each year, according to a 2014 report from Value Chain Management International. It's part of a global problem where 1.3 billion tonnes of food gets thrown out each year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Food Waste