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Today, federal, provincial and territorial environment ministers agreed to work collectively toward a common goal of zero plastic waste. To this end, they approved in principle a Canada-wide strategy on zero plastic waste, which outlines a vision to keep all plastics in the economy and out of the environment.

The sharing economy describes how peer-to-peer technology and changing economic and environmental values are dramatically altering the fundamental questions - who, what, where, when and how - related to the production and consumption of goods and services. These and other factors are driving a growing number of sharing economy companies, consumers, and people-as-businesses to choose shared access over ownership for an increasing number of goods and services.

These resources will help you start your own repair cafe!

  • Outreach Tips (offered as a guide or checklist)
  • Basic Supplies List (an outline of what’s most useful to have on hand)
  • Volunteer Descriptions Pamphlet
  • Steps to Starting a Repair Café – 2014 Workshop Powerpoint
  • Detailed Steps & Questions to Consider when starting a Repair Café (developed by Pittsfield MA Repair Café)

We’ve been talking about the sharing economy for over a decade, and even in the face of regulatory backlash, it shows few signs of slowing down. Alternative forms of employment characteristic of the gig economy have become so mainstream, few of us think twice about hopping into a stranger’s car…or even inhabiting someone else’s home thanks to the mobile apps that connect us. What forces continue to power the sharing economy and how has it changed all these years later? Experts Carlo Ratti and Rachel Botsman weigh in.

 

As more people worldwide join the information and digital society, and the lifetimes of devices decreases, electronic waste is piling up, posing a new environmental threat. But a new report shows how our discarded devices are a valuable resource worth billions.

Focus on these three areas of your life to see the biggest returns.

My friend and I were standing in a crowded local pub last weekend, waiting for a band to start playing, when he said to me, "You need to write a step-by-step guide to giving up plastic." "I've already done that!" I replied, thinking of the numerous articles I've written on going zero waste, but he shook his head. "I don't know where to start. You need to break it down even further, telling me exactly what needs to change and where I can get plastic-free alternatives."

Canadians use between 9 and 15 billion plastic bags a year - that's enough to circle the globe a whopping 55 times. And that's a lot of oil being used to make single-use bags that are discarded a few minutes after use. Going plastic-free can be a challenge - and that's no joke. Plastic is everywhere.

Canada’s resource for information on plastic consumption, use, impacts, and solutions.

Canadians are keenly aware of the consequences tied to plastic waste and are eager to learn how they can reduce the impact of choices they make as individuals, businesses, and governments.

Despite the increasing interest in plastics and reducing its environmental impacts there is no single national repository that provides governments, businesses, educators, researchers, and citizens the necessary scope of information to take meaningful action:

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