Swap, Share, Repair | Waste Reduction Week in Canada

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Swap, Share, Repair

iFixit is a wiki-based site that teaches people how to fix almost anything. Anyone can create a repair manual for a device, and anyone can also edit the existing set of manuals to improve them. Our site empowers individuals to share their technical knowledge with the rest of the world.

iFixit helps thousands of people repair their devices every day. Why do we do it? Because many companies don't provide repair parts and documentation to end users. We believe everyone should have the right to maintain and repair their products.

Everyone has clothing and other items at home that aren’t getting the love and attention they deserve. Swap Events are a fun way for people to bring gently used clothing or small household items and swap them for ‘new’ items! Swap Events are also a great opportunity to have fun, get creative, meet your neighbours, and reduce waste.

Secondhand Sunday is your chance to get rid of any unwanted, reusable items you have laying around. Simply leave them at your curb for your neighbours to take for free. Then, get in on the action. That thing your neighbour no longer wants could be exactly what you need. At the end of the day, just take back any remaining items or drop them off at an appropriate secondhand shop!

​The Share Reuse Repair Initiative (SRRI) brings together government, business and community innovators to build a culture and economy of sharing, reuse and repair in the Greater Vancouver region in order to prevent waste, support lighter living and enable circular innovation   The SRRI has three key functions: to collaboratively test promising prototypes; to build a more consistent foundation of support through policy, funding and partnerships; and to amplify existing efforts while catalyzing positive new innovation.

The sharing economy describes how peer-to-peer technology and changing economic and environmental values are dramatically altering the fundamental questions - who, what, where, when and how - related to the production and consumption of goods and services. These and other factors are driving a growing number of sharing economy companies, consumers, and people-as-businesses to choose shared access over ownership for an increasing number of goods and services.

These resources will help you start your own repair cafe!

  • Outreach Tips (offered as a guide or checklist)
  • Basic Supplies List (an outline of what’s most useful to have on hand)
  • Volunteer Descriptions Pamphlet
  • Steps to Starting a Repair Café – 2014 Workshop Powerpoint
  • Detailed Steps & Questions to Consider when starting a Repair Café (developed by Pittsfield MA Repair Café)

We’ve been talking about the sharing economy for over a decade, and even in the face of regulatory backlash, it shows few signs of slowing down. Alternative forms of employment characteristic of the gig economy have become so mainstream, few of us think twice about hopping into a stranger’s car…or even inhabiting someone else’s home thanks to the mobile apps that connect us. What forces continue to power the sharing economy and how has it changed all these years later? Experts Carlo Ratti and Rachel Botsman weigh in.

 

From power tools, to camping equipment to children toys — for the past five years, the Toronto Tool Library and the Sharing Depot have loaned out over 65,000 items. Torontonians can borrow any of these items the same way one can borrow a book from the library.

However, the sharing network that has helped city residents build, borrow and fix is now in need of a helping hand itself.

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